Ryeberg

Ryeberg Playlist: Rub A Dub

1) Put Words In My Ears

Buffalax is Mike Sutton of Ohio, the Internet’s most famous practitioner of soramimi — the art of purposely hearing a foreign-language song as if it’s being sung in your native tongue. Sutton’s version of the English lyrics appear as subtitles.


Buffalax, “Benny Lava” (Kalluri Vaanil, 2008)

In 2008, Sutton “buffalaxed” his first song, this clip from the Indian-Tamil movie “Pennin Manathai Thottu.” Prabhu Devahas often hears “Benny Lava!” when he appears in public. No surprise, there’s a “Buffalax Official Worship Page” on Facebook.

2) Put Words In My Mouth

The guys at Day Job Orchestra enjoy a different game: they put their own audio track over politicians’ speeches, TV commercials, and scenes from TV shows: see “Star Trek.”


dayjoborchestra, “Star Trek “Chin Hitler” (2008)

3) Put Songs In My Mouth


SamRick, “One Direction: Story of My Life Dubbed” (2014)

4) Put Thoughts In My Head


BBC Comedy, “Funny Talking Animals: Walk On The Wild Side” (CBBC, 2009)

5) Be Your Own David Attenborough


Randall, “The Crazy Nastyass Honey Badger” (2011)

6) Read My Thoughts

Certain creatures are easier to interpret than others.


klaatu42, “Ultimate Dog Tease” (2011)

7) Say No More

The story reaches its happy end, the heroes are reunited, hurray. What is there to say?


Olof & CJ, “Lord Of The Rings Voiceover” (2006)

8) Exorcise The Music

We get it. All’s well that ends well. Do we even need the rousing soundtrack?


Auralnauts, “Star Wars Minus Williams” (2014)

9) Sound The Way It Looks

Loosen a few of the familiar formal elements from a film and it looks a lot different. Try this 1985 music video, “Dancing In The Street” with David Bowie and Mick Jagger, with an audio track more faithful to the video images.


digitalofen, “Music Videos Without Music: Dancing In The Street” (2014)

10) Tell Of The Things I See

When you see a music video, you may feel compelled to simply change up the lyrics. Creator of “Literal Music Videos,” Dustin McLean did just that in 2008. As ever, he’s faced claims by the big record companies for copyright issues. Yawn.

Dustin McLean, “Literal Video Of Head Over Heels by Tears For Fears” (2008)

11) “In A World Where Movie Makers Tell The Truth”

Oscar-winning films with grand themes are pretty stupid too if you tell it like it is with your own honest trailers, especially if Jon Bailey at Screen Junkies is available to do your voiceover.


ScreenJunkies, “Honest Trailer: Gravity” (2014)

12) Exorcise My Scouser

For guaranteed laughs, get a Scouser to do your voiceover.


ripdemfilms, “Scouse Exorcist (2009)

13) Tell Of The Things I Hear

When Eddie Vedder is singing, subtitles are much appreciated.


misheardlyricsguy, “Misheard Lyrics For Yellow Ledbetter by Pearl Jam (2007)

14) Subtitles Visible To The Subtitled


skitHOUSE, “Interviewing Iraqi Resistants” (2004)

15) Put Words To Music

Here Josh Groban displays the inanity of a certain rapper’s tweets…


JimmyKimmellLive, “Josh Groban Sings Kanye West Tweets” (2011)

16) Bleeping, Whatever The Amount

In certain cases, no dubbing. Just add a bleep censor to certain words. Call it “unnecessary censorship.”


Count Von Count, “The Count Censored” (2008) - thx Steve Galloway

17) Mime The Mimics


robcantor, “29 Celebrity Impressions, 1 Original Song” (2014)

Wondering how Rob Cantor did this? Click here.

18) Skwerl

Reverse dubbing—making a language unintelligible—is a funny game for anyone who has been at a dinner table with everyone speaking a language you only barely understand.


Brian and Karl, “How English Sounds to Non-English Speakers” (2011)

19) Yo Yo Put That Music Into Me

When hip-hop is dubbed over with an affecting cello line (The Swan by Camille Saint-Saëns — courtesy of Yo Yo Ma), dance artist Charles Lil’ Buck Riley exhibits a physical lyricism that could never be translated, substituted, or subtitled…


OpeningCeremonyNY, “Lil Buck and YoYo Ma” (Lil’ Buck and Spike Jonze, 2011)

- Ryeberg

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Ryeberg has been publishing essays about online video clips since 2009. It's part magazine of ideas, part video show-and-tell for writers, artists and critics. To know more about Ryeberg, go here.